Chemical Factory R.

Chemical Factory R.

It was a giant of chemistry.

The history of this abandoned chemical factory goes back to the year 1900, when a company built a cement factory on these premises. The site was chosen wisely, because in the area the industrial processing of lime and cement had been going on since the 18th century. After finishing construction, cement was produced using a dangerous process involving a rotary kiln. This went on until 1939, when another company bought the factory. Due to the war, from 1944, the factory produced synthetic bauxite.

After the war, the Soviet occupants completely removed the factory as reparations. Only the kiln and empty halls were left.

In 1950, a fresh start was made in the production of fertilizing phosphate which was produced using the old kilns.

The finished product - defluorination of a mixture of raw phospahte, phosphoric acid and soda - was of extremely high quality which made it important for the export to western countries.

Years later, new buildings were constructed and the area was formed into a mighty chemical factory. After investing almost 140 Million East German Mark, the factory could produce about 200.000 metric tons of sulfuric acid and about the same amount of cement.

In 1979, the factory was integrated into a newly founded agro-industrial combine. To meet with the ever-increasing demands regarding the production, two new, 100 meter long rotary kilns had been installed in 1972. .

After the German reunification, the demand for the products from the factory went into a decline. Caused also by dubious investors, the end of the production and closure of the factory in 1999, couldn't be averted.

Gallery Update: New photos from May 31, 2016.

Attention - there is a caretaker on the premises who is watching for illegal entries. A legal visit is possible, however. If you find the caretaker and pay some money, you can explore the factory as long as you want.

Use the contact form to ask for the phone number of the caretaker.

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